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ukbobboy
Expert 2

Re: How to block a device

@ClockEnd @RoyB 

 

Hey CE

 

Yes, you did say, "I provided a means of preventing a device being added. Making sure there are no available changes does that". 

 

Well, Roy did answer your statement, which to me seems logical and right. However, if you think Roy is wrong then please explain why?

 

 

UK Bob

 

 

 

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ClockEnd
Advocate 1

Re: How to block a device

@ukbobboy I wasn't responding to Roy. I was making the point in my initial reply that I had stated I was surprised the password had not stopped the new device been added. And I stated there was no way of explicitly blocking a device which was the question.  If I could quote that would have been clear, instead of this thing that I appear to be disagreeing with people when I am not.

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Champcar59
Contributor 5

Re: How to block a device

@ukbobboy I wasn't responding to Roy. I was making the point in my initial reply that I had stated I was surprised the password had not stopped the new device been added. And I stated there was no way of explicitly blocking a device which was the question.  If I could quote that would have been clear, instead of this thing that I appear to be disagreeing with people when I am not

 

One question springs to mind regarding someone piggybacking on your internet connection (how did they gain access to it in the first place) was this a case of misguided good intentions and now they are just ripping the p### out of it. One thing you should never do is allow someone access to your internet connection unless you can trust them totally.If you can not be guaranteed what they are going to use it for (downloading illegal content) you will be held responsible and could be cut off from your ISP.

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RoyB Scholar 4
Scholar 4

Re: How to block a device

@ukbobboy @Char17 @Champcar59 @ClockEnd @starman73 

 

You always have to think ‘shared house’ in these scenarios. So the presumption is several people on a shared router, probably on WiFi, so you can’t change the router password without telling all your housemates (or family, if that is who you are sharing with) the new one, which defeats the object. (I might, however, lock down the router admin in this case).

 

So I wonder if a NowTV device, signed in on under the old password and never signed out of, would keep working? In this case, no-one need know the new password, and perhaps it hasn’t been breached?

 

But what are the issues if someone else in the house is operating like this?

 

Firstly, set a Payment PIN so they can’t buy passes.

 

Secondly, maybe their rogue device is taking up a slot in your allowed six that you need? But that apparently isn’t the case here.

 

Thirdly, maybe they are using up one of your allowed two simultaneous streams, and you want both?

 

That could be an annoyance.....

 

But whatever it is, having a password no-one else knows, and deleting any unexpected devices from your six slots, will block it, by preventing it coming back and being Signed In again.

 

The only remains question is if you did change your password, and somebody then learnt what it was, how did they do that? Is the password physically stored somewhere, in clear, on a device or on paper, that someone else could access and learn it?

 

If I had to store passwords in a situation like that, I would keep them in a locked box, and wear the key round my neck at all times Smiley Tongue


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starman73
Regular 1

Re: How to block a device

So I wonder if a NowTV device, signed in on under the old password and never signed out of, would keep working? In this case, no-one need know the new password, and perhaps it hasn’t been breached?

 

This is a possibility.  If you have Netflix it provides the option to force off all users.  So it may be that someone who has an iPad and has logged into the account in the past can still access Now TV.  This is speculation on my part so please don't have a pop at me if I am wrong.

 

One way to stop this in the short term is as I suggested which is to have no available slots.  However if I was in this predicament, I would let the passes lapse on the account, apply a credit card with a short expiry date, add a payment PIN and set up a new account.

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RoyB Scholar 4
Scholar 4

Re: How to block a device

@ClockEnd 

 

NowTV broke the Community software, and it isn’t back to normal yet.

 

You can’t pick up smileys either Smiley Tongue

 

Your device-blocking 6-slot-filling 3-change-using method fails as the month rolls over, thereby forcing the OP to stay up and do it all again straight after midnight.

 

Not to mention being a right pain for the OP if he wants to use either option for himself.


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starman73
Regular 1

Re: How to block a device

someone piggybacking on your internet connection

 

People can piggy back on mine as Virgin allow them to via a hotspot. Interestingly I can block individual devices, but determining the device is tricky given that all android phones look the same.  Also given there are 4 of us in the house and my teenagers will share access with friends pretty hard to police. 

 

As an aside, that written one of my son's friend did log in to Netflix on our main TV, so we had that for a few months!  Even found the same in a hotel that someone hadn't logged out.  And you can't de-register devices with Netflix just have to force everyone off.

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starman73
Regular 1

Re: How to block a device

Your device-blocking 6-slot-filling 3-change-using method fails as the month rolls over, thereby forcing the OP to stay up and do it all again straight after midnight.

 

Not ideal, I agree, but I did use that method to stop unexpected devices coming on when there were only 4 slots so I could separate the sports devices from the cinema/entertainment devices and make sure there could be no more than 2 simultaneous streams on each account.  Works pretty well, though I have had to clear a couple of slots in advance of a trip abroad. 

RoyB Scholar 4
Scholar 4

Re: How to block a device

@starman73 

 

If the Virgin thing is anything like what BT offer, it just lets Virgin users in WiFi range of your router use some separate bandwidth instead of their mobile data.

 

It’s better than a guest account on your router (and much better than giving out the router password for full access!) as it is treated separately from your regular account.

 

And having people use your Netflix account (or using someone else’s, as you did) is a pretty victimless crime, except for Netflix potentially losing revenue of course, unless they jack your subscription up to a higher level, or use up the rather more generous number of simultaneous slots Netflix provide.

 

And not being able to block or deregister devices is one of the few downsides of Netflix never caring what devices are in use in the first place Smiley LOL


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ukbobboy
Expert 2

Re: How to block a device

@starman73  @Char17  @RoyB  @Champcar59  @ClockEnd 

 

You know Guys

 

We are all speculating on how to fix Char's problem without having a full understanding of how this predicament came about.

 

May I suggest that if Char wants a definitive answer then get back to the forum with more information, rather than us continuing to make wild and random guesses, that way at least one of us can come up with a proper answer.

 

 

UK Bob

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